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Stearmans Big n Little at Toledo

Stearmans Big n Little at Toledo

So, if you like giant scale or micro RC, there were some Stearman PT-17 biplanes for you to choose from.

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World Models ARF. Looks like 1/4 scale-ish to  me.

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E-flite’s micro flyer! Sweet!

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HobbyKing Durafly Me-163 Komet 950mm High Performance Rocket Fighter (PNF)

HobbyKing Durafly Me-163 Komet 950mm High Performance Rocket Fighter (PNF)

The German Me-163 Komet was the worlds first and only rocket powered fighter. Designed as a rapid response interceptor to combat the US daylight bombing raids, the Komet was years ahead of anything the allies possessed with speeds upwards of 600mph and an incredible rate of climb. The Komet’s volatile rocket system accelerated the Me-163 to an altitude of 39,000ft in just minutes from which it then only had 3 minutes of fuel left to attack its targets with its deadly 30mm canons. Once out of fuel it became a glider and very vulnerable to fighter attack when returning to base for landing. Although it can be considered a failure in operational terms, the Me-163 has gone down in history as a truly legendary aircraft of WW2 thanks to its ground breaking design and blistering rocket performance.

The Durafly Me-163 is in itself a truly a ground breaking model. Not only does this Komet feature a fully working scale ‘dolly’ style undercarriage, blistering performance and a high quality finish, but it is designed out of the box to accept a model rocket engine! In its Plug and Fly (PnF) form, Durafly’s 950mm (37.5″) span Me-163 comes with all electronics pre-installed and ready to hook up to your choice of 6ch receiver. A minimal part count allows assembly to be completed in just a few steps. The molded EPO has a highly detailed surface finish externally, carbon reinforcement internally and features a color matched hard plastic belly skid. It also has good access to all electronics via the battery/canopy hatch, excellent cooling through out and of course a very authentic looking scheme. Quality is definitely the name of the game.

Designed for pilots with some experience, Me-163 benefits from incredible flight performance and stability throughout the speed range. Full power climb outs, virtually unlimited vertical, huge loops, blistering rolls and very fast passes are easily had at full throttle. Slow the Me-163 down and she’s just as stable and has no hint of a stall. Using the recommended 2200mah 30-65C 3S lipo and supplied 6×4 prop, you can expect flight times well beyond 6 minutes and with excellent performance throughout. If you are looking for a lighter set-up, the Durafly Komet is equally happy on a 1300mah 3s, especially at lower speeds.

For those of you looking for the ultimate scale experience, the optional rocket system is a simple drop-in affair (see manual for details), and will give you a thrill like no other. The working dolly-drop is activated at the flick of a switch on your transmitter, allowing for the most scale of take-offs.

Durafly have taken EPO scale models to the next-level with the Komet, and have put you firmly in the pilot seat with the new Me-163.

Features:

  • Scale and fully functional dolly style undercarriage
  • Ready made for drop in optional rocket motor system
  • High level of pre-assembly and minimal part count
  • Tough EPO construction with extensive carbon reinforcement
  • Super smooth surface finish
  • Stable and high performing aerodynamic design
  • Large canopy/battery hatch for easy access to electronics
  • Authentic and re-applied decals and paint finish

Specs:

Wingspan: 950mm (37.4″)
Length: 585mm (23′)
Flying Weight: 800-850g (28-30oz)
ESC: Durafly 40A brushless ESC
Motor: Durafly 2836 2200kv Outrunner
Prop: 6×4 (2 included)
Servos: 2 x metal geared 9g (aileron/elevator) 1 x 9g rudder
Controls: 6 ch ‘Elevons’ (aileron/elevator), throttle, rudder, gear (dolly), optional rocket switch.

Requires:

  • Your Own 5-6ch Tx/Rx with elevon/delta mixing
  • 1300-2200mAh 11.1v 3S lipo battery (30C min)

Optional:

  • Turnigy receiver controlled switch (9107000266-0)
  • C6-0 (18mm) class rocket motor from local supplier

#9306000109-0 – $169.47

Gallery > HobbyKing Durafly Me-163 Komet 950mm High Performance Rocket Fighter (PNF)

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Road to Top Gun — Pre-Event Stats

Road to Top Gun — Pre-Event Stats

Pulling together an event as big and as nuanced as Top Gun, a lot of planning comes into play. Also, there’s a lot of paperwork involved, and one of the important sheets of paper is the Pilot Registration/Bio form.

Road to Top Gun -- Pre-Event Stats

Frank Tiano the mastermind of, and creator of the Top Gun Scale Invitational, just tabulated some interesting numbers as things start to come together. Still a few weeks away, here’s some stats you might find interesting.

Total Aircraft Entries:      119

AIRPLANES PER CLASS:

PRO-SPORT               44

PRO-PROP                  17

EXPERT                      16

PRO-JET                    12

TEAM                         11

UNLIMITED              10

MASTERS                  9

Most popular Prop:  P-47    16 Entries

Road to Top Gun -- Pre-Event Stats

2nd most popular Prop: Hellcat  4 Entries

Most popular Jet; Tied 4 ea.  BAE Hawk, Grumman Cougar, F-16C, MiG-15

Radio Brand Usage:

Spektrum                               57

Futaba                                    30

JR                                           18

Jeti                                         4

Airtronics & HiTec               3 Each

 

Aircraft

Weight:  Heaviest 123 Lbs. Lightest 17 Lbs.

Number of entries over 40 Lbs:  53

Wing span or Length:  Largest: 164” Shortest 58”

Number of entries over 100”     78

Pilots: Home State, or Country

U.S. Pilots

FL                    44

CA                   10

MA                  5

IL                    4

NC                   4

TX                   4

NY                   3

OH                  3

AL                   2

AZ                   2

KY                    2

ME                   2

PR                    2

TN                   2

UT                   2

IN                   2

MN                  1

NE                   1

CO                   1

GA                   1

International Pilots

BRAZIL          3

CANADA        2

ARGENTINA 1

AUSTRALIA  1

DOM. REP.     1

ENGLAND      1

JAPAN           1

VENEZUELA  1

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DJI Live Event: Model Airplane News is on the Scene

DJI Live Event: Model Airplane News is on the Scene

DJI is announcing its latest product in a live event in New York City today, and the Model Airplane News team scored an invite to get the scoop! We understood what all the fuss was about when we saw the latest DJI product: the Phantom 3. From live YouTube streaming to 4K resolution with live link to any tablet within a 4-mile range, it’s packed with new technology.

DJI Live Event: Model Airplane News is on the Scene

 

Here’s a shot (using our iPhone) of a live feed of the Singapore skyline! The perfect clarity is impressive to say the least.

DJI Live Event: Model Airplane News is on the Scene

Here’s the official press release on this latest quad-camera!

 

DJI Unveils Next Evolution in the World’s Most Popular Consumer Drone
New Phantom 3 Professional and Phantom 3 Advanced open top tier aerial imaging to everyone
• First integrated professional-quality aerial cameras available to any level of pilot
• App features self-editing function for sharing professionally edited aerial videos instantly
• Integrates with YouTube Live to stream aerial footage in near real time

New York, April 8, 2015 – DJI, the world leader in creative robotic equipment, today announced the next evolution in its ground-breaking Phantom drone platforms – the Phantom 3.
With two variations, the Phantom 3 Professional and Phantom 3 Advanced, this new milestone in aerial innovation provides greater control and creative options from the sky.
Both Phantom 3 versions feature the strongest professional control features DJI has developed so far. Using DJI’s innovative Visual Positioning System (VPS), these Phantom 3 platforms can hold their positioning indoors without GPS and can easily take off and land with the push of a button.
Controllers for the Phantom 3 come paired with DJI’s Lightbridge technology, which allows pilots to see what the Phantom 3 camera is seeing in HD (720p) at a distance up to 1 mile (1.6 kilometers) with almost no latency.
“In developing the next generation Phantom, DJI remained committed to providing a top tier flight experience in one easy-to-use platform,” said DJI CEO Frank Wang. “We pride ourselves in creating a flying camera that fits in a backpack and can be ready to take professional quality videos from the sky in less than a minute.”
The Phantom 3 Professional is capable of shooting 4K video at up to 30 frames per second, while the Phantom 3 Advanced records at resolutions up to 1080p at 60 frames per second. These cameras are stabilized using 3-axis gimbals to keep the video smooth regardless of flight or wind conditions.
Both models shoot 12 megapixel photos using a 94⁰ FOV, distortion-free lens, and a high-quality, 1/2.3” sensor that is more sensitive to light than the sensor in previous Phantom 2 Vision models.
All camera settings, including ISO, shutter speed and exposure compensation, can be set using both the DJI Pilot app and the physical controls on the remote controllers. The DJI Pilot app also features a Phantom 3 flight simulator for virtually practicing aerial manoeuvers, and a ‘Director’ feature, which automatically edits the best shots from flights into short videos that can be shared immediately after landing.
The upgraded app also allows pilots to live stream their flights to YouTube.
“Pilots, whether they are journalists, extreme athletes, or global travelers – will not just be able to share aerial videos of where they were, but will also be able to send a YouTube link to their friends and colleagues to show them the aerial perspectives of where they are right now,” said DJI’s San Francisco General Manager Eric Cheng. “This has tremendous potential for changing the way we share experiences with one another.”
Additional Features
• Enhanced GPS (with GLONASS) for better position accuracy
• Flight logging to help document flight statistics
• Safe flying zones to prevent take off or flight near airports and other sensitive sites
• Dedicated remote controller with camera and flight controls for enhanced ease of use and safety
• Rechargeable Intelligent Flight Battery with sensors for real-time battery information
The Phantom 3 Professional and Phantom 3 Advanced will begin shipping in a few weeks for a suggested MSRP of US$1,259 and US$999, respectively.

 

 

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Mixing Custom Colors for Scale RC Airplanes

Mixing Custom Colors for Scale RC Airplanes

Mixing custom colors for scale airplanes can be a tricky job, and the difference between accurate and “pretty close” can be the difference between winning and not even placing at a scale contest. For those who are considering going the next step in scale accuracy, this article digs a little deeper into this “colorful” and often misunderstood part of scale modeling.

Mixing Custom Colors for Scale Airplanes RC Radio Control Model Airplane News

Custom colors

After collecting the proper aircraft color and markings documentation, the biggest challenge we modelers face is accurately reproducing the scale colors. Without the proper paint, our models can’t match the documentation of the full-size aircraft. Many newcomers are quite surprised to learn that there really are no catch-all formulas for mixing military or civilian colors. Sure, you can buy cans of paint that say “Cub Yellow” or “Olive Drab,” but more times than not, these pre-mixed colors still won’t exactly match the shades of yellow or olive we want. The reasons for this are many, ranging from the amount of pigment used to the color of the primer that’s under the final coat of paint. This is why if we want to be truly accurate in our color application, we have to be able to slightly alter the color, shade and hue of our paints.

Mixing Custom Colors for Scale Airplanes RC Radio Control Model Airplane News

Illustration by FX Models

Color spectrum

Going back to art-class basics, there are only three primary colors: red, yellow and blue. Primary colors are those that can not be made by mixing other colors together. Secondary colors are made by mixing the primary ones. Red and yellow make orange, yellow and blue make green, red and blue make violet or purple. All other colors are created from primary and secondary colors.

The exact color of your secondary color depends on the proportions in which you mix the primary ones. Black and white aren’t colors; they are tones and are used to lighten or darken the color. Black and white together creates gray. The complementary color for a primary color is what you get by mixing the other two primary colors. The complementary color for red is green (yellow and blue mixed); the complementary for blue is orange (red and yellow mixed); and the complementary for yellow is purple (red and blue mixed). If you mix all three primary colors together, you get a tertiary, or neutral, color. Neutral colors are browns and grays and they can also be created by mixing a primary color and a secondary color together.

Mixing Tip 1: Think small

When you mix paints for the first time, it is best to experiment in small batches until you figure out the ratios of the paints you are using. Think drips and drops and teaspoons, not pints and quarts. Mixing larger quantities can get very expensive! Once you figure out the ratio you need for a specific color using a particular paint, you can increase the volume to produce as much of it as you need. Don’t forget to keep this information in a safe place for future reference.

Mixing tip 2: Add dark to light

It takes only a bit of a dark color to change a light color, but it takes considerably more of a light color to change a dark one. So for example, if you want a specific shade of blue, start by adding blue to a white base. Never add white to a blue base in an attempt to create a lighter blue. Generally speaking, basic military camouflage paint schemes include various shades of green, brown and gray.

color2

Three Skyraiders in a row. Which one is the correct shade of gray?

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

> What’s the easiest way to make a brown?

Mix a primary color with its complementary color. You can add green to red, orange to blue, or purple to yellow, or. Each combination produces a different color brown, so here again, experiment with small amounts to zero in on the color combination and ratio you need.

> What’s the easiest way to make a gray?

Mixing black and white doesn’t usually give you a good start for scale gray colors. Mix some orange (or yellow and red) with a blue then add some white. You’ll always want more blue than orange, but experiment with the amount of white you use. You can also mix blue with a dark earth color.

Mixing Custom Colors for Scale Airplanes RC Radio Control Model Airplane News

> Why do my tertiary colors keep turning out muddy?

If you mix too many colors together, you’ll simply get a nice mud color. (Not bad for weathering, but more on this another time!) If your gray or brown doesn’t come out right, instead of adding more colors in the hope that it will work out, just start over.

Mixing colors is not just a chore reserved for scale modelers. Mixing colors also helps when you want to paint an engine cowl or wheel pants to match the rest of a film-covered sport plane. Sometimes just a little color tweak will make all the difference in the world. There really is a method to all this color madness, and once you learn the basic steps, you’ll soon be able to duplicate any color you need. Just like anything else worth doing right, all it takes is practice and a little know-how.

 Mixing Custom Colors for Scale Airplanes RC Radio Control Model Airplane News

Federal Standard color sample fan.

Painting your model

Mixing Custom Colors for Scale Airplanes RC Radio Control Model Airplane News

One basic rule you should always follow when painting a model is to apply the lightest colors first and then add darker colors. This usually means you apply the light underbelly pale blue or light gray color first. Next apply the lightest of the top surface colors and then apply the darker ones. When painting a Japanese Zero,  in a South Pacific  scheme, first paint the entire plane in the light blue under surface color, then add the medium gray or  dark green upper surface color. If you paint light-colored aircraft markings and insignias, follow a similar procedure and first apply the marking color, mask off the numbers and insignias, then apply the other colors. When you remove the mask, the lighter insignia color will be revealed. Make sure you use a good-quality automotive masking tape. Like anything else in this hobby, it takes time and practice to perfect the technique. And by the way, color matching isn’t just for the outer colors; interior cockpit colors, exposed engine colors and even wheel-well colors all need to be properly matched to your documentation.

Mixing Custom Colors for Scale Airplanes RC Radio Control Model Airplane News

Icing on the cake

Weathering and other surface details will make your model look even more realistic. First, you have to use the proper weathering for the aircraft, whether it’s mechanical damage or discoloration from exposure to the natural elements. Second, because of the model’s scale size, we have to tone it down in its entirety to make up for the difference in the scale distance between our eyes and the model. This is known as “color perspective.”

Mechanical weathering includes things like chipped paint, wear patterns from the pilot walking on the wing and rubbing against the edge of the cockpit, exhaust stains, dirt and mud. All must be subtly applied. Natural element weathering takes the form of sun damage and rain streaks. Bright sun fades the overall color of the upper exposed surfaces and water streaks are formed in a vertical fashion as the aircraft is in a parked, stationary attitude.

Mixing Custom Colors for Scale Airplanes RC Radio Control Model Airplane News

Color perspective can really mess with you head. You can perfectly match the color chips and mix the colors but when you place the model outside in the sunlight, the colors look too intense. If you looked at a 1/4-scale model from 25 feet away, you would have to look at the full-size plane from 100 feet away for them both to look the same relative size. But there’s four times as much space and air between your eyes and the full-size plane so, its colors seem slightly muted. To duplicate this on the model, you either have to mix all the paints slightly off color, or you can apply the lightest mist of medium gray over the entire model to alter its color perspective. This treatment goes over everything: canopy glass, markings, propeller blades, tires … everything that reflects light. But regardless of the type of weathering you’re talking about, less is always more. Too little is always better than too much. We’ve only scratched the surface here about mixing custom colors, so if you have any questions or comments, please post a comment below.

To truly appreciate scale models with superbly painted and weathered finishes, you have to attend a national- or regional-level competition such as Top Gun, the AMA Scale Nationals or the U.S. Scale Masters Championships. The models competing at these levels are true works of art.

Author: Scale Techniques Columnist, George Leu. (June 2006 issue MAN)

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Futuristic RC Jet Takes Flight

Futuristic RC Jet Takes Flight

Bet you can’t name this plane! That’s because it’s a sport design by Eric Rantet, a “combination of Star Wars, Flash Gordon, the 1950s first jets and Gee Bee racers.” This 8-foot-span beauty built and flown by Phil Noel is powered by a Kingtech K210 turbine and, as you can see from the footage captured by its onboard cameras is a sleek and fast flyer. Thanks to Dean and Pete Coxon for taking this great video and posting it on their Tbobborap1 YouTube channel.

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RC Giant Scale – Nick Ziroli’s New Triplane

RC Giant Scale – Nick Ziroli’s New Triplane

Known for his many great flying, giant scale WW2 warbird designs, Nick Ziroli Sr., has been finishing up his newest set of plans, this one for the WW1 Sopwith Triplane. This sport scale design has a sport airfoil for improved flight performance and is not intended for scale competition.

RC Giant Scale - Nick Ziroli's New Triplane

Using his signature traditional balsa and plywood construction, the Triplane is powered with a Zenoah G-38 gas engine and the finished version will have a 69 inch wingspan.

RC Giant Scale - Nick Ziroli's New Triplane

The Sopwith Triplane is about 1/5-scale (20%), and it performs beautifully. Nick is doing some final tweaks and when it is all worked out, the plans will be available through the Ziroli Plans website, along with many of his other plans and building accessories.

RC Giant Scale - Nick Ziroli's New Triplane

Be sure to stop by and see their new website at: https://ziroligiantscaleplans.com/

 

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Tipsy S2 — An electric sport scale vintage airplane you can build

Tipsy S2 — An electric sport scale vintage airplane you can build

Designer Dennis Sumner has build several excellent flying model and his newest is the Tipsy S2, plans now available at the AirAgeStore website. Featured in the July 2015 issue of Electric Flight, the construction plans are at: http://www.airagestore.com/tipsy-s2.html

Tipsy S2 -- An electric sport scale vintage airplane you can build

Here’s Dennis’ take on this attractive vintage flyer.

Scale and unique airplanes always appeal to me and when I first saw an article on the Tipsy S2 in (VAA) March 2009 Vintage Airplane,  (Sister Publication to EAA’s Sport Aviation),

Tipsy S2 -- An electric sport scale vintage airplane you can build

I knew I needed to model it.  I used the three view from the article to develop my 1/6th scale plans. The Tipsy line of airplanes was designed by Belgium designer Ernest Tips. The S2 was designed and built back in the mid 1930’s and powered with a variety of small 2 to 4 cylinder motors. After doing some research I found OO-TIP in a Belgium Airplane Museum and it was powered by a 2 cylinder 28 HP Douglas Sprite engine. I loved the “Spitfire” look with elliptical surfaces and also the red, white and black color scheme.  I have continued researching Ernest Tips and his airplanes and came across a great book of all his designs. Les Avions Tipsy Airplanes by Vincent Jacobs.  I ordered the book direct from the author in Belgium.

Gallery > TipsyS2

Getting Started: The construction is all balsa with a fully sheeted wing, the tail surfaces are built up and use laminated construction for the outlines of the fin, rudder, stab, and elevators. The airplane has a fairly short nose so try and keep the tail feathers built a lightly as possible. The engine and stabilizer are set to 0 degrees and the wing to +2.

Tipsy S2 -- An electric sport scale vintage airplane you can build

Tail Group: Start by making templates for the rudder, fin, stab, and elevators to form the laminations. I used foam board. The laminations are (3) pieces of 3/16 x 1/6 balsa soaked in warm water for 20 minutes. Glue the laminations with Titebond glue and when they are dry place them over the plans and add the other 3/16 square balsa sticks and other 3/16 balsa pieces noted on the plans. Note grain direction on the S1 piece. Because of the unique design of the stabilizer and elevators you will need to use 2 separate elevator pushrods.

Tipsy S2 -- An electric sport scale vintage airplane you can build

Fuselage: Build the fuselage box from F1 to the tail first, then add the firewall and nose balsa pieces. Start by cutting F1 and F2 from 1/8 plywood along with the 3/16 balsa wing saddle and the 1/8 balsa stabilizer doubler.  Build 2 fuselage sides over the plan with 3/16 balsa sticks. Glue F1 and F2 to one side of the fuselage then join the 2 sides upside down over the top view of the plans making sure everything is lined up with the fuselage centerline. Sand the inside tail post on both sides to give a 3/16 thick tail post before gluing together. Add 3/16 cross balsa sticks at the positions of F3, F4, and F5, again make use of the top view to get correct lengths for the cross pieces. This will be more important once the turtle deck formers are in place as the 1/16 turtle deck sheeting will be flush with the 3/16 square longerons.  Cut out your firewall from 3/16 plywood and the 2 pieces of ¼ balsa that will form the front of the fuselage. Shim your fuselage off your building board upside down with some scrap wood (I used ¾ plywood and ¼ balsa) this will allow you to glue the front side ¼ balsa pieces and align the firewall at 90 degrees.  Again build over the top view of the fuselage to get everything lined up. The cowl is held on with ¼ magnets keyed with 1/8 wood dowels. Add the ¼ balsa triangle to the top of your ¼ front balsa sides then add the top balsa block to form the top of the fuselage from the firewall back to F1A. Glue F2a, F3, F4 and F5 to the top of the fuselage making sure to keep them 90 degrees to the top of the fuselage. Add the ¼ square balsa stringer and sheet the turtle deck with 1/16 balsa.  Next cut your hatch parts out with floor from 1/16 balsa along with H1, H2, H3 and H4. Assemble in place on the fuselage to get good alignment. The hatch is held in place with (8) ¼ magnets. Add 3/16 balsa gussets on the inside corners of the fuse along with the inside floor of the hatch. I pinned my hatch to a piece of flat ¼ balsa and planked the hatch with 3/32 balsa.  Mount your motor and build the removable cowl. The cowl is held on with (4) ¼ magnets and 1/8 dowels. Using the plans cut balsa blocks for the sides, top, and bottom. Mount your 1 ½ spinner, snap the hatch in place and shape the front cowl and fuselage. Cut out the cockpit area. The engine cylinders are cut from 1/16 balsa assembled on 1/8 dowels. You will need 20 of the smaller discs and 12 of the larger discs. I did some simple shaping with the cylinders chucked into my cordless drill and some sanding blocks. Add rocker covers and pushrod details and glue in place after the fuselage is covered. Leave the forward 3/32 balsa sheeting off until the wing is mounted, this allows access to drill the hole in the wing for the dowel.

Tipsy S2 -- An electric sport scale vintage airplane you can build

Wing: The wing is fully sheeted in 1/16 balsa, make up your 4 skins and cut out all the ribs. Also cut R2a and R3a from 1/8 plywood, these will strengthen the ribs where the hardwood landing gear blocks mount. Pin the bottom 3/16 square spar to the bottom sheeting then locate the ribs and the back 1/8 square spar. Use the R1 tool on the plans to set R1 to 88 degrees to provide total dihedral of 4 degrees.  I used a piece of tapered 1/8 balsa to build in washout in the outboard section of the wing (R7, R8, and R9) Locate the 1/8 lite plywood aileron mount between R6 and R7, trace around the mount then center the 1/16 aileron plate and cut the skin our before gluing the 1/8 mounting plate. Framing the ailerons is the only tricky part of the wing. Start by marking the location of the (2) ¼ pieces on the sheeting. They will frame the ailerons. Don’t glue these 2 pieces together as this will be the aileron hinge line. With the lines marked on the sheeting you can cut a ½ section out of the ribs for the ¼ pieces. Once the ribs are glued to the bottom skin sand the ¼ balsa pieces to match ribs R6, R7, R8, and R9. Use pins to mark the hinge line through the bottom skin and inside edge of the ailerons. This will make cutting the ailerons out of the wing after sheeting easier. Also use pins to make witness marks for the hardwood landing gear blocks. Glue the top 3/16 spar and 1/8 square spars and add shear webs to the 3/16 spars. Add pull strings for the aileron servos before gluing the top skins in place.  When dry sand the skins flush to the leading edge of the ribs, glue the ½ x ½ balsa leading edge in place.  Shape the leading edges and give the panels a good sanding then cut the ailerons free. Add the balsa tips and hinge the ailerons. Glue the panels together and glass with three pieces of ¾oz. glass 1”, 2” and 3” wide.

Tipsy S2 -- An electric sport scale vintage airplane you can build

Final assembly and finishing: Before bolting on the wing make sure the stabilizer and motor are zero degrees and the wing is plus 2 degrees. Drill the hole in the wing for the dowel then add the 3/32 bottom front fuselage sheeting. Glue the stabilizer and fin in place, add steerable tail wheel or skid. Add balsa stab fillets once the stabilizer and fin are glued in place. Cut the wheel pants parts out and assemble on 1/8 music wire, then sand and shape. The rudder and elevator servos are mounted in front of F2. Fabricate and glue in a battery tray. I used white Ultracote and True Red Monokote for my prototype. Glue the cylinders in place and add a pilot and windscreen. There are templates on the plans for the 1/8 music wire landing gear and the windscreen. My 00-TIP graphics were from Callie’s Graphics

Tipsy S2 -- An electric sport scale vintage airplane you can build

In the air:  Make sure you balance at 2 ¾” to 3” from the leading edge at the fuselage. With the Scorpion 3008-32, 3S2600 Lipoly, and an APC 10x5E prop I am getting 100 watts of input power. With the light wing loading it flies very well. It requires a touch of right rudder on the takeoff roll. Early on I was concerned about tip stalling due to the elliptical wing tips but with the built in washout and 35% Aileron differential it really doesn’t have any bad habits. Try some stalls at altitude to get a feel for it then bring it in for your landing. It does some nice aerobatics with loops, rolls, Cubin-8’s. I think you will be pleased with its looks and performance.

Specifications:

Wingspan: 50”

Length: 36”

Weight: 2 lbs. 8 oz.

Wing area: 382 sq. In.

Wing Loading: 15.5 oz /sq. ft.

Power required: 480 class outrunner. (Scorpion 3008-32 used)

Radio: 4 Channel (udder, throttle, ailerons and elevator)

Gear Used:

Transmitter: Spektrum DX8

Receiver Spektrum AR6200

Servos: (4) JR Sport SM22

Motor: Scorpion 3008-32

ESC: Castle Thunderbird 36

Battery: Glacier 3S2600

Prop: APC 10x5E

 

 

 

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Road to Top Gun: Shaun Roblee — Grumman Hellcat

Road to Top Gun: Shaun Roblee — Grumman Hellcat

Shaun Roblee of Huntington Beach California, will be traveling to Top Gun this year with his impressive Grumman Hellcat. Using a fiberglass fuselage and built up wing and tail featuers, Shaun says he chose the Ziroli Hellcat because he just loves the way they fly. As for a full scale project, I wanted to do the big cat as it was kind of the unsung hero at the end of the war.

Road to Top Gun: Shaun Roblee -- Grumman Hellcat

The big Grumman Hellcat has a 96.5-inch wingspan  and is controlled by Shaun’s 12-channel Spectrum DX 18 transmitter and radio system.  For power, Shaun bolded in a BME 110cc twin-cylinder gas engine and chose Sierra giant retracts. Working hard throughout the winter months, The Hellcat is now ready for flight testing and tweaking. We look forward to seeing Shaun’s Hellcat on the tarmac at Paradise Field!

 

Road to Top Gun: Shaun Roblee -- Grumman Hellcat

Road to Top Gun: Shaun Roblee -- Grumman Hellcat

 

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RC Workshop Build-Along — Sopwith Camel — Part 23– Painting

RC Workshop Build-Along — Sopwith Camel — Part 23– Painting

We are nearing the end of this year long project and are now at the stage where we add the color paint coat. Following the Poly Brush Sealer coats, which are applied with brush, all the future paint coats are sprayed on.

RC Workshop Build-Along -- Sopwith Camel Painting

I use a HVLP (High volume, low pressure) paint gun as it produces much less over-spray and provides a wide range of control for the amount of paint and air being mixed and applied to the model.

The first step is to apply  the Poly Spray Silver undercoat. It is very heavily pigmented with aluminum powder and needs to be completely mixed and reduced before spraying with the gun. it is best to use a wood dowel to mix up the settled pigment from the bottom of the can.

RC Workshop Build-Along -- Sopwith Camel Painting

Here’s the fuselage with two coats of silver applied. The tail surfaces and the wings are next.

RC Workshop Build-Along -- Sopwith Camel Painting

Here are the tail surfaces with silver undercoat, hung up to dry between coats.

RC Workshop Build-Along -- Sopwith Camel Painting

For the larger surfaces I shoot them with paint while horizontal blocked up on my work/paint table. I go over all the edges first and then apply paint to the rib tapes. I then fill in one coat with span-wise coats followed by chord-wise coats. I apply two coats of each color with about an hour drying time between each application.

RC Workshop Build-Along -- Sopwith Camel Painting

Here’s the light underside buff tan color applied to the wing panels.

RC Workshop Build-Along -- Sopwith Camel Painting

RC Workshop Build-Along -- Sopwith Camel Painting

Same technique goes for all the other surfaces, the stabilizer and elevators, rudder, fin and all four ailerons. Also the tan color is applied to the fuselage bottom surface.

RC Workshop Build-Along -- Sopwith Camel Painting

I let the first color dry over night and then I add the top surface color. In this case the vintage Sopwith brown color, which is I think more attractive than the olive green color you see so much used on Sopwith airplanes.

It is always important to have proper ventilation and here’s my at hock setup. It works great in keeping the over-spray and fumes from building up in my basement!

RC Workshop Build-Along -- Sopwith Camel Painting

RC Workshop Build-Along -- Sopwith Camel Painting

For the fin and rudder, I used Juneau white which is a slightly darker white, or a very light shade of gray. In fact, one of the reasons I love using the Poly Tone brand of paint is that it has a fantastic shelf life, if you seal the cans properly. I bought this white paint for a Stearman project I did back in 1996! 19 years ago!

So here it is, all the cloth covered surfaces have been sealed and painted. I think the brown is a striking color for the Camel and will be very attractive when the graphics and decals are applied

RC Workshop Build-Along -- Sopwith Camel Painting

The next step will be the stained and varnished plywood side panels which will be done next week.

Here are a could of photos of a Camel with the brown base color paint scheme.

RC Workshop Build-Along -- Sopwith Camel Painting

In some photos the brown looks green but that’s how the slides were processed. It is always best to see the full-size plane in person and match the colors you want with color chips.

RC Workshop Build-Along -- Sopwith Camel Painting

Stay tuned!

Gerry

 

Model Airplane News - The #1 resource for RC plane and helicopter enthusiasts featuring news, videos, product releases and tech tips.