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Warbirds over Delaware:100+ Flightline Action Photos

Warbirds over Delaware:100+ Flightline Action Photos

One of our favorite destinations during the flying season is warbird events, and the granddaddy of them all is the annual Warbirds over Delaware meet held at Lums Pond State Park in Bear, DE. This three day event is an IMAA event for giant scale warbirds from all eras. From WW1, the 20s and 30s, to WW II, Korean war, Vietnam, and the cold war, this is the place to be if you like seeing heavy metal war machines doing what they do best–Fly! Hosted by the Delaware RC Club, this event draws people from all across the country with even a few international pilots showing up from the UK and Germany. Canada was well represented and several pilots showed off their impressive machines that have been at national level competitions like the AMA Scale NATS, U.S. Scale Masters, and Top Gun. Everything from gasoline engine engines, radials and kerosene-burning turbine engines fill the air with that unforgettable sound of power! Check out our photo gallery that just scratches the surface of the many impressive warbirds that put on the show of shows for the impressive crowds!

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Enjoy!

Gallery > WOD14

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5 Easy Steps to the Knife-Edge Spin

5 Easy Steps to the Knife-Edge Spin

In my opinion, the knife-edge spin is one of the most impressive extreme aerobatic maneuvers. It’s very demanding for the pilot and the airframe. In traditional knife-edge, the aircraft is rolled approximately 90 degrees from upright level flight. Then altitude is sustained by using top rudder. When the maneuver is complete, the pilot will roll the model 90 degrees to return to upright level flight. Compared with a traditional knife-edge, in a knife-edge spin, the model’s attitude remains parallel with the horizon. To do the knife-edge spin, you have to gain a lot of altitude. Then, when you are ready to begin, bring your throttle back to about 50-percent power and apply full down-elevator and right or left aileron and rudder. When the model begins to tumble, it will change its attitude and begin a tumbling descent. This is the knife-edge spin. When you are ready to exit the maneuver, simply neutralize all stick inputs, and the model will quickly come out of the spin. Then pull up-elevator ever so gently to an upright and level flight exit.
During a knife-edge spin, your model will quickly lose a lot of altitude. This is because during this maneuver, lift comes from your fuselage side area, which doesn’t even compare with the lift produced by your wing area. Make sure you gain a lot of altitude before you begin this maneuver.

FIRST THINGS FIRST
When you start to do a maneuver that stresses the airframe, e.g., the knife-edge spin, you must make sure that you have a rigid airframe with the best possible linkage setup. Also make sure that your model has more than enough servo power.  Now let’s talk about you, the pilot. Most pilots roll more comfortably in one direction than the other. If you prefer to roll right, it’s better for you to spin to the right during a knife-edge spin and vice versa. Once you’re familiar with the maneuver, you’ll be able to spin in either direction.
Begin at a high altitude and with your model parallel to the runway. In the language of aerobatics, we say our position relative to the runway is our center. When the model approaches the center of the aerobatic box, you will begin the maneuver.

1. In this example, we fly the maneuver from left to right. When you have gained enough altitude (spin-entry height) and the model is in the center of the aerobatic box, start the maneuver. Fly into the wind, pull the throttle back to about 50-percent power and apply down-elevator and left aileron and rudder. The model will tumble but will soon enter a knife-edge spin, or a tumbling spin.

2. You need to hold the same inputs throughout the maneuver, but some models may react differently. If you have too much down-elevator deflection, your model may enter an upright flat spin. If you find that this is the case, you must decrease the endpoint values of your control surfaces. Start by decreasing elevator deflection, and if the model still does not want to do a knife-edge spin, slightly decrease aileron deflection, too.

3. To control your model’s rate of descent during this maneuver, increase the throttle. On 3D-capable models, you can add power to increase their angle of attack. At a lower throttle setting, the model will sit at a lower angle relative to the horizon; increasing the throttle will lift the fuselage because of rudder authority.

4. To complete the maneuver, simply neutralize your sticks. As soon as you do this, your model will come out of the knife-edge spin. Timing is everything, and you need to time it so that your model exits the maneuver in an attitude that’s perpendicular to the runway.

5. When the model is perpendicular to the runway, pull back on the elevator for a gentle 90-degree turn to exit in upright level flight and parallel to the runway.
You’ve finished the maneuver! Sit back, relax and enjoy the rest of your flight!
Give yourself time to learn this maneuver. If you have difficulties, do not blame yourself; instead, check your airframe and tweak your endpoint adjustments as described in Step 2 so that your model will fly the knife-edge spin. Next time, I’ll continue my discussion of various aerobatic maneuvers, but until then, practice, practice, practice and have fun!

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RD_ Camera Gimbal Tips.mov

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RD_Surf’s Up!.mov

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Flybys from the flightline at Warbirds over Delaware!

Flybys from the flightline at Warbirds over Delaware!

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Model Airplane News - The #1 resource for RC plane and helicopter enthusiasts featuring news, videos, product releases and tech tips.

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Axial Yeti RTR Rock Racer Review

FAST FACTS
Price: $430
Top Speed: mph
Hot
> Big stance works off-road
> Aluminum shocks
> Body and cage are easily removable
> Brushless motor delivers speed . . .
Not
> . . . but sensorless suffers on the rocks
> No decal sheet (cry me a river, I know)
> It’s well equipped but not cheap

Axial Gives Rock Racing a Serious Boost

In the full-size world, rock crawling has been around for a while. Jeeps, Toyotas and the like have a long, rich history of being driven over rocks. The competitive side took off—as in got national attention—in the last decade, and shortly after the slow-going technical crawling got the spotlight, rock racing spun off. Rock racing really hit its stride when the unlikely marriage of desert racing and rock racing was formed with the King of the Hammers race. On the RC side of things, scale crawling as dominated the scene for a few years now. Rock racing has, ironically, gotten off to a slower start. We may be on the verge of a real explosion as Axial has made King of the Hammers style racing very doable—right out of the box—with its new Yeti.

FEATURES
Chassis
The Yeti features an all new chassis for Axial. It’s a shallow tub design that made  molded composite plastic and reinforced with honeycomb-shaped ribbing. It’s essentially a half tub with the front being configured similar to an 1/8-scale buggy in that it narrows at the front to hang lower suspension arms. The back end cuts off abruptly because of the 4-link rear suspension and solid rear axle. Protecting the front tongue of the chassis is a bumper mount and bumper setup that looks like and function like a typical short course design. It’s soft and flexible and will hopefully absorb enough energy from frequent rock poundings that the Yeti will spend more time on the track than the bench.

 

THREE WAYS TO SKIN A CAT

Rock crawlers that go slow and need maximum clearance, usually have solid axles front and rear. Go-fast vehicles that need to handle corners, typically have independent front and rear suspensions. Real world off-road racers (i.e., Baja desert racers and short course competitors) often use independent front suspensions for the superior handling in corners and over bumps and jumps and use a solid rear axle for durability. If you check out a King of the Hammers lineup you’ll see all three configurations, as one set “perfect” configuration has yet to be determined. There are solid axle rigs that are durable and rock crawl well, but suffer in the high speed sections; there are a few independent front and rear rigs that despite their successes have yet to really be totally accepted; and lastly, there are a whole bunch of independent front and solid rear axle rigs. There are three ways to skin a cat when it comes to King of the Hammers or Ultra4 racing.

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Axial Yeti RTR Rock Racer Review

FAST FACTS
Price: $430
Top Speed: mph
Hot
> Big stance works off-road
> Aluminum shocks
> Body and cage are easily removable
> Brushless motor delivers speed . . .
Not
> . . . but sensorless suffers on the rocks
> No decal sheet (cry me a river, I know)
> It’s well equipped but not cheap

Axial Gives Rock Racing a Serious Boost

In the full-size world, rock crawling has been around for a while. Jeeps, Toyotas and the like have a long, rich history of being driven over rocks. The competitive side took off—as in got national attention—in the last decade, and shortly after the slow-going technical crawling got the spotlight, rock racing spun off. Rock racing really hit its stride when the unlikely marriage of desert racing and rock racing was formed with the King of the Hammers race. On the RC side of things, scale crawling as dominated the scene for a few years now. Rock racing has, ironically, gotten off to a slower start. We may be on the verge of a real explosion as Axial has made King of the Hammers style racing very doable—right out of the box—with its new Yeti.

FEATURES
Chassis
The Yeti features an all new chassis for Axial. It’s a shallow tub design that made  molded composite plastic and reinforced with honeycomb-shaped ribbing. It’s essentially a half tub with the front being configured similar to an 1/8-scale buggy in that it narrows at the front to hang lower suspension arms. The back end cuts off abruptly because of the 4-link rear suspension and solid rear axle. Protecting the front tongue of the chassis is a bumper mount and bumper setup that looks like and function like a typical short course design. It’s soft and flexible and will hopefully absorb enough energy from frequent rock poundings that the Yeti will spend more time on the track than the bench.

 

THREE WAYS TO SKIN A CAT

Rock crawlers that go slow and need maximum clearance, usually have solid axles front and rear. Go-fast vehicles that need to handle corners, typically have independent front and rear suspensions. Real world off-road racers (i.e., Baja desert racers and short course competitors) often use independent front suspensions for the superior handling in corners and over bumps and jumps and use a solid rear axle for durability. If you check out a King of the Hammers lineup you’ll see all three configurations, as one set “perfect” configuration has yet to be determined. There are solid axle rigs that are durable and rock crawl well, but suffer in the high speed sections; there are a few independent front and rear rigs that despite their successes have yet to really be totally accepted; and lastly, there are a whole bunch of independent front and solid rear axle rigs. There are three ways to skin a cat when it comes to King of the Hammers or Ultra4 racing.

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MAN @ Warbirds over Delaware — Friday Fighters

MAN @ Warbirds over Delaware — Friday Fighters

After a great day of enjoying all the flightline action, I have sone awesome photos of the fighters flying on Friday. From Jets and multi-engine types to WW1 aeroplanes and lots of Pipers, everyone had a great time at Lums Pond State Park! Here’s just a few of them. Can’t wait to see what shows up tomorrow!

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Rotordrone_Camera Gimbal Tips.mov

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EF_Starting Gas Engines.mov

Model Airplane News - The #1 resource for RC plane and helicopter enthusiasts featuring news, videos, product releases and tech tips.