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HobbyKing Skipper XL All Terrain Airplane EPO 864mm (PNF)

HobbyKing Skipper XL All Terrain Airplane EPO 864mm (PNF)

From HobbyKing:

Does size matter?

Well, we don’t know either, but the Hobbyking™ Skipper just got bigger!

Just like its smaller sibling, the Skipper XL is capable of operating from almost any surface including water, ice, snow, grass and more, making it an incredibly versatile model. With its super low wing loading and high performance brushless power system the Skipper XL is an absolute blast to fly!

The installed power system (PNF version) provides more than enough power for water or grass take-offs and provides unlimited vertical performance. Large control surfaces give great control authority and make for a wide flight envelope.

Molded from ultra-tough EPO foam, the model is lightweight and durable. The wing halves are joined through the fuselage with twin carbon fiber spars providing excellent rigidity. The fuselage of the Skipper has a flat bottom for easy take-offs from any surface and features a hydrodynamic step to allow for easy water handling.

A large, removable cockpit cover gives fantastic access to the forward compartment for batteries etc and has a transparent canopy for a semi-scale appearance. This cockpit cover can be replaced by an alternative, custom designed plywood FPV equipment platform (see related items) to quickly transform your Skipper XL into an all-terrain FPV vehicle.

Access hatches are also provided mid-fuselage and in the motor nacelle for easy installation and maintenance.

The Skipper XL is available in “Plug and Fly” and kit form allowing you get into the air as quickly as possible, or to cutomize your set-up to your own requirements.

Features:

  • Ultra durable EPO foam construction
  • Plug and Fly – simply add your own radio system and 3~4S LiPoly battery
  • All terrain flight ability – capable of flying from water, snow, ice, grass and more
  • Fully sectioned airfoil on wing and stabilizer
  • Twin carbon fiber wing spars
  • Plywood tail sub-structure
  • Motor and elevator servo extension wires pre-installed
  • Simple access to all equipment
  • Molded PVC protector for fuselage bottom
  • Colorful decal set
  • Hardware included
  • Easy to assemble

Specs:

Wingspan: 864mm
Length: 1169mm
Motor: 3637 1000kV
ESC: 40A
Servos: 3 x 9g
AUW: 1020g

Required:

  • 4 Channel transmitter and receiver (min)
  • 3~4s 2200~ 3000 mAh LiPoly battery
  • Suitable charger
  • FPV equipment (optional)
  • Foam safe adhesive

#9107000383-0 – $195.20

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Tatic DroneView Wi-Fi HD FPV Mini Camera

Tatic DroneView Wi-Fi HD FPV Mini Camera

From Tatic:

The DroneView is the mini-sized camera for any and all R/Cers, hobbyists or action video enthusiasts! It’s small and lightweight, so you can attach it to your bike, board or virtually any R/C model – and it’s First Person Viewcapable with the free DroneView app. Enjoy exciting videos and still shots, all at an affordable price.

Features:

  • Shoot 720p HD video and still photos
  • Download or stream content via Wi-Fi with the free DroneView app
  • Use the included receiver extension for an optional remote function

Includes:

  • DroneView camera
  • 4GB micro memory card
  • Power battery module
  • USB charge cord
  • Remote receiver extension

TACZ1000 – $79.99

Tatic DroneView Wi-Fi HD FPV Mini Camera (1) Tatic DroneView Wi-Fi HD FPV Mini Camera (2)

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Estes Proto-X Six RTF

Estes Proto-X Six RTF

From Estes:

When the weather won’t let you fly outside, you can still fly inside with the Proto-X SIX. Six rotors make the Proto-X SIX extra stable in the air and the radio gives you the choice to fly the Proto-X SIX in either normal or True Direction mode. There are also buttons that let you execute pro flips on command. Don’t wait another minute; get a Proto-X SIX and start flying today!

Features:

  • Assembled Proto-X SIX airframe with LED lights & advanced 3 + 3 stabilization system
  • 4-channel 2.4GHz radio with Auto-Flip button & 2 flight modes
  • 1S 100mAh LiPo battery & USB charger
  • 6 replacement blades
  • Ready to fly as soon as you charge the battery
  • Perfect for flying in the house, in your garage or in a gym
  • Includes an interference free radio, so you can fly with your friends
  • True Direction mode makes the Proto-X Six move the same way you move the sticks regardless of orientation
  • Color-coded LEDs make it easy to stay oriented by day and fly in the dark

Specifications:

Diagonal Measurement: 55 mm (2.16 in)
Weight: 11.6 g (0.4 oz)

Requires:

2 x “AAA” batteries

ESTE50** – $59.99

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Futaba SBS-01RB Brushless Motor RPM Sensor

Futaba SBS-01RB Brushless Motor RPM Sensor

From Futaba:

Ideal for brushless-equipped planes, helis, gliders and cars, the SBS-01RB Brushless Motor RPM Sensor lets you view rpm data right from your transmitter! It’s plug-and-play and easy to install – just solder two wires and you’re set. No other devices are needed. The SBS-01RB is compatible with any telemetry-equipped Futaba transmitter and receiver, and works with S.Bus2 technology.

Specs:

Length: 18.7 in (475 mm)
Weight: 0.13 oz (3.8 g)
Input Voltage: DC 3.7-7.4V
Range: 360-300,000 rpm

FUTM0857 – $34.99

futm0857

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Futaba GYA460 6-Axis S.Bus Air Gyro

Futaba GYA460 6-Axis S.Bus Air Gyro

From Futaba:

Whether you’re a mild or wild pilot, you’ll find lots of reasons to like the GYA460. Beginner mode – one of three selectable flight modes – gives new pilots the stability and confidence needed to master most maneuvers. The GYA460’s easy set-up and S.Bus compatibility are just icing on the cake!

Features:

  • 3-axis gyro sensors and 3-axis acceleration sensors, for the ultimate in flight control.
  • Three selectable flight modes, including Beginner mode that provides automatic horizontal level return control and flight attitude angle control.
  • Gyro mode assists pilots learning inverted flight and aerobatics, while Gyro Off mode puts flyers in complete control.
  • Separate sensitivity adjustments for aileron, elevator and rudder.
  • Easy to set up, and S.Bus compatible.
  • A low profile design, compact in size and light in weight.

Specs:

Dimensions: 1.37 x 1.06 x 0.47 in (35 x 27 x 12 mm

Weight: 0.35 oz (10 g)

FUTM0790 – $79.99

futm0790

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Sopwith Camel — Video Sneak Peek

Sopwith Camel — Video Sneak Peek

Featured in the upcoming December 2015 issue of MAN, the newest construction article is for editor Gerry Yarrish’s 1/4-scale Sopwith Camel. Designed with CAD and featuring laser cut parts (also available), this WW1 classic is sport scale and it has excellent flight stability and performance. It has an 84 inch span and is powered by a Zenoah G-38 for power.

Featured as a detailed 31 part Build along on the MAN website, the complete construction project can be seen starting at: www.modelairplanenews.com/camel1

Plans can be purchased at: http://www.airagestore.com/sopwith-camel-2515.html

3

You can also download the construction article at: www.modelairplanenews.com/plans

 

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Sneak Peek — Lowers-Minges LM-1 Reno Racer

Sneak Peek — Lowers-Minges LM-1 Reno Racer

Designed and built for a MAN construction article by Mark Rittinger, the LM-1 racer was the winner of the Designer Scale category at the Toledo RC Expo and trade show. The detailed construction article will be in the January 2016 issue of MAN so stay tuned for more. Here’s what Mark had to say about his Toledo show winner.

LM1

“It’s doubtful that more than a handful of people have ever heard of the Lowers-Minges LM-1. I discovered a 3-view drawing of it in a 1974 “Flying” magazine article about the then up-and-coming Reno Unlimited class racing technologies. Though never built, it was to have been powered by a 500hp Ranger Inverted V 770 V12, yet it only had a 16.5 foot wingspan.

Fullscale LM1

No mention was made of methods or materials, but I suspect it may have been planned to be of wood construction. Small, undoubtedly fast, and no doubt a handful to fly, I thought it would make a great challenge as a model. Was I ever right on that one!

test flight

The LM-1 uses conventional balsa and lite-ply construction and a foam wing core to speed construction.

Video of First Flight

 

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The model is designed to be hand launched, both keeping the design simple and lighter without having landing gear.

LM flight 4

It is a very clipped wing design so it is easy to handle and transport.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The plans have all the details needed to build this unique never-built full-size Reno Racer.

plansLM1

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Red Arrows RC Airshow

Red Arrows RC Airshow

Check out the  team of  Steve and Matt Bishop flying their turbine-powered Red Arrow BAe Hawks, complete with wingtip smoke! Very impressive flying and coordination from this father and son team, who wow the crowds at events around the globe. Enjoy the show, courtesy of the father and son video team of Pete and Dean Coxon.

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Micro Warbird Makeover

Micro Warbird MakeoverOver the past several years, the arrival of ARFs has provided a means for many to quickly get into RC flying. Today, preassembled models have improved to the point where many exceed the level of ability, interest, and even flying skills of the purchaser. No matter the reason, ARFs do fill a very necessary niche in the RC airplane marketplace. While I personally enjoy creating a model from materials or a builder’s kit, I still find a great deal of satisfaction in being able to get a new model airborne in short order. Micro Warbird Makeover
All the necessary tools and material to execute your “mini makeover”- airbrush, markers, and paint!
Micro Warbird Makeover
All the factory-applied markings have been removed prior to paint application.
However, there is one thing that ARFs don’t do well and that’s provide unique models with personality or an appearance that’s different from that of its production line mates. If you want to learn some new skills, let’s personalize that typical cookie-cutter flyer!Weathering and detailing an ARF isn’t something to be done only to larger and more expensive warbirds. The nice part about this adventure is that you start with a relatively inexpensive model with proven performance. We can dramatically change its appearance without affecting that impressive flight performance. The techniques involved are the same regardless of the size, cost or complexity of the basic model. I was initially concerned that this treatment would add significant weight to the model and affect its fun-flying qualities. Have no fear; the ParkZone Ultra Micro T-28 Trojan flies just as well as it ever did and only gains 2.5 grams in the process.  Micro Warbird Makeover The first step is using documentation to choose the full-scale version you want to duplicate. Most popular subjects have nearly unlimited schemes.

The first step is to choose a color scheme that you like and want to apply to your model. This can be as involved or as simple as you’d like but today, unlike the “olden days,” there are tons of images available from a variety of Internet sources-all you have to do is pick one! In the case of my T-28, I chose a restored Trojan that duplicated the markings used in Southeast Asia in the 1970s. It’s the typical brown and green “camo” scheme that was worn by most airplanes at the time. It creates a whole new look on the model, distinctly different from the bright “Navy trainer” colors in which the model is supplied. Other choices might include an alternative Navy trainer scheme of all yellow with red or green mission bands, the attractive early USAF aluminum and orange/red scheme, or even the Desert camo seen on the Fennec version. The choices are nearly unlimited and there just has to be one out there for you.

Since the Micro Trojan is molded foam, you need to use foam-safe paint for your makeover. Do not use lacquer-based spray cans as many of the solvents and propellants used can damage the Trojan’s surfaces. To be safe, use acrylic, water-based paint such as the Model Master series by Testors. These paints are a perfect match to the actual colors used on the full-scale aircraft. They’re available in small bottles that can be brushed or airbrushed on to your model. Some colors are also available in easy to use spray cans. Either way, make certain the paint you choose is foam friendly. Another benefit of the Model Master paints is this it bonds well to the surface and isn’t easily separated by using masking tape for color separation lines.

 

Micro Warbird Makeover

In the case of camo schemes, the airbrush is used to freehand apply the colors with an airbrush. No masking required!

SCALE MARKINGS
OK, now that all the paint is applied, there only three things left-the markings, panel lines and the weathering. Nothing particularly complicated here, as long as you have a computer and decent printer. To produce the markings I needed, I scanned a set of after-market decals that I had in my collection and enlarged them to the appropriate size for my micro model and printed them out in “high-quality” mode with my ink jet printer. I printed them onto self-adhesive label paper sheets to which I had applied clear tape over the printed images. I scuffed the tape down with a Scotch Brite pad to remove the gloss and then carefully cut around the edges with a new no. 11 hobby blade. I then removed the backing and applied the markings to the model. Everything seemed to stick very well, even the smaller markings. Since the T-28 is electric powered, no clear top coat or fuel-proofing is necessary.

 

Micro Warbird Makeover
Small pieces of card stock or posterboard are used as straight edges for the application of panel lines.

PANEL LINES
Using photos or reference drawings, apply your panel lines with a fine-tip, permanent marker. The application can be as simple or elaborate as you choose. I use heavy card stock as a straightedge and cut a slight arc in a length of card stock to form a guide for applying the panel lines to round contours like the fuselage. The inclusion of these lines adds a visual interest and creates a pleasing and realistic overall effect.

WEATHERING
While obviously not essential, a bit of weathering adds to the model and further enhances realism. The technique is really easy. Use a small, pointed brush and some silver paint, and dab the surface randomly to create a worn, chipped-paint effect. Pictures can be helpful but imagination is really what gets the job done. Just imagine how aluminum panels, vibrating against each other, pounded by kicked-up dirt, sand and small stones would affect the airplane’s finish. Leading edges are generally impacted the worst with the paint being completely gone on some of the more dramatic examples. Take your time and work carefully. Don’t fall into the “if some is good, more must be better” trap. Subtlety always appears more realistic than heavy-handed applications!

A final touch comes with the application of exhaust staining on the fuselage sides. The T-28 was notorious for discoloration and staining in this area, so much so that many of the standard factory paint schemes often included black-painted panels to minimize the dirty appearance and to make maintenance easier. I used the airbrush and a grayish-black color to simulate the exhaust. Note how the density is reduced the further the exhaust gets away from the source.

 

Micro Warbird MakeoverThe mini Trojan flies by in its handsome new “skin.” Quite a difference from the stock version! Note exhaust staining on fuselage side.

TIME TO ADMIRE
This is the part that makes it all worthwhile. Place your model on your workbench and just look at it. Compare it to the one pictured on the box in which your Trojan arrived. Some difference, huh? You think you’re impressed? Wait until your flying buddies see it! You’ll clearly be identified as the newly emerging scale guru. The nice part about the exercise is that the technique, research and materials are the same, regardless of the size or scope of the project. You’ll have learned some new techniques, created a distinctively different model and, hopefully, sparked an interest in doing even more on your next model!

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Conquer the Three-turn Negative Spin

Conquer the Three-turn Negative Spin

In the early days of aviation,  spins were often fatal because most pilots did not understand how to properly recover from a spin. While in an upright spin, the pilot would pull back on the elevator stick in an effort to save the airplane (and their life!) and only make the situation worse. Since the spin occurs when the aircraft is in a stalled state, adding elevator just keeps the airplane stalled. If you are new to the aerobatic world, you may be unfamiliar with the term “stall” when it comes to various aerobatic moves, as most student pilots are only aware of the consequences that stalling an airplane can have on a landing. However, some maneuvers are to be performed while the aircraft has stalled, like the stall turn, the tail slide, and the spin, to name a few.

Let’s examine the key control inputs in executing the three-turn negative spin. A proper negative spin entry begins from inverted horizontal flight at a fairly high altitude while flying parallel to the runway. Then you must decrease throttle and feed in enough down-elevator to maintain altitude. Eventually, elevator authority will not be effective and the airplane will stall. At that instant, the nose will fall and a wingtip will drop in the direction that the spin rotation should be flown. If the left wingtip drops, the pilot should perform the spin to the left, which will require left aileron, right rudder and down-elevator. Similarly, if the right wing tip drops, the pilot should apply right aileron, left rudder, and down-elevator.

Let’s start by taking a look at how your aircraft has been set up. Then, we will go over all vital inputs needed to execute this maneuver, as well as a few key flight techniques. After all, the goal is to make you a better pilot!

First things first
I like to use flight modes. In the simplest form, this means that all dual and/or triple rates can be found on one switch. If you want to perform a maneuver like the spin, you don’t need to remember which independent switch setting you used for the rudder, elevator and ailerons. Instead, you can apply all of these deflection and exponential amounts to one switch position and simplify your life.

If your transmitter does not have the ability to use a flight mode, or something to the same extent, I recommend that you make your low-rate settings applicable to the spin. Then you can make your high-rate settings apply to only extreme 3D maneuvers. I think it is critical to minimize the amount of time you spend searching for rate switches so you can concentrate on flying the aircraft!

The amount of control throw that’s required to spin the aircraft will differ between airframes. To start, I recommend 15 degrees of aileron deflection with 20% exponential, 20 degrees of elevator deflection with 35% exponential, and 35 degrees of rudder deflection with 50% exponential for the low rate setting.

Please remember that exponential (expo) should be used with care. Expo “softens” the feel of the aircraft around center stick on a given control surface to make the aircraft less erratic. A lot of exponential should only be used with a lot of control throw; otherwise, the aircraft may be extremely sluggish. Start with small increments and increase the percentage until you are content with how your aircraft feels.

The three-turn negative spin
Begin by climbing to a safe altitude, which for a typical park flyer that has a wingspan between 48 and 52 inches, is between 500 and 600 feet. Your entry altitude needs to allow us enough space to establish a brief vertical downline after the spin rotations have been completed. Once the airplane is at altitude, fly it inverted and parallel to the runway at about 25% throttle. When the airplane is about 100 feet away, decrease throttle slowly to the idle position. Feed in enough down-elevator to hold altitude. At some point, you will run out of down-elevator and the airplane will stall. This should occur while the aircraft is directly in front of you. At this point, both the nose of the aircraft and a wingtip will drop. Now, let’s say that the left wing drops first. This means that the direction of the spin should be to the left. Use left aileron, right rudder, and down-elevator to complete three rotations. Then, neutralize all inputs to establish a vertical downline. Push 90 degrees and increase throttle to exit the maneuver in inverted, level flight.

 

 

Conquer the Three-turn Negative Spin

 Four steps to success
Now that you have a brief overview of the general control inputs that are required, let’s explore this maneuver as well as a few key flight tips by breaking this stunt into four steps:

  • STEP 1. Align the aircraft parallel to the runway and inverted. If the airplane is travelling with some airspeed, pull the throttle back to idle and slow the aircraft down as it approaches you. Now, if applicable, activate your “spin” flight mode. While the aircraft is slowing down, you’ll need to feed in down-elevator to sustain altitude. It is important to time this portion of the entry so the airplane stalls directly in front of you. When the airplane stalls, one wing will drop to determine the direction of the spin. In this example, we are spinning to the left, which requires left aileron, right rudder, and down-elevator.
  • STEP 2. Most aerobatic airplanes will spin using only a touch of aileron input. Using too much aileron may accelerate the spin rotation at times, which is not the desired result. Rather, we want to obtain a constant rate of rotation. At most, use about 10 degrees or so of aileron deflection, but hold in full down-elevator and full rudder input.
  • STEP 3. With your throttle still in the idle position, keep track of the amount of rotations the airplane has performed and maintain the same control inputs.
  • STEP 4. As the last rotation nears completion, you’ll need to neutralize all control inputs and establish a vertical downline. Then, after a brief line segment is shown, perform a gentle 90-degree push to exit inverted in horizontal flight. It is important to realize that heavier airplanes take longer to exit a maneuver like the spin. Once you neutralize control inputs, the aircraft may complete another portion of a spin rotation. When you know the tendencies of your plane, you will be able to compensate for this by timing your inputs properly so the rotation stops at exactly three rotations.

Flight advice
When watching various pilots performing the spin, I have seen a few problematic areas arise. One major issue I’ve encountered is having the airplane’s engine quit during the maneuver. This often happens as the pilot has a relatively low idle when using a glow or gas-powered model. When flying an airplane with an internal combustion engine, set a safe idle before you take to the skies. If you are using an electric aircraft, I prefer to have an idle where the prop is spinning at a very low rpm. I know that some pilots prefer to have the motor stop completely in the idle position, but I do not like the delay that it sometimes takes for the motor to activate. After all, it’s better to be safe than sorry!

Before entering into the spin, the airplane must stall. As I mentioned, this is shown by having the wingtip and nose of the aircraft drop before you enter the spin rotations. If this doesn’t happen, it means that you had too much airspeed going into the maneuver and a forced entry is applied.

Now that you have learned the basic fundamentals in performing the three-turn negative spin, go out and practice! The cliché practice makes perfect is true! If you have trouble performing this maneuver, break it down into steps, examine the setup of your aircraft and use the tips in this column to serve as a guide.  BY JOHN GLEZELLIS

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