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Futaba 6K 6-Channel Computer Radio System

Futaba 6K 6-Channel Computer Radio System

Modelers would be hard pressed to find another 6-channel radio system with as many functions as the 6K at a comparable price. Telemetry sensors keep pilots up-to-date on critical flight data such as temperature, RPM, altitude, voltage levels and more. S.Bus servos can be programmed through the transmitter, and controls are positioned to be within easy reach. For safety and handling convenience, the antenna is inside the transmitter case. Versions are available for both airplane and heli control; both come with an R3006SB receiver. With its exceptional versatility, the 6K meets the needs of a wide range of R/C pilots!

FUTK6100 6K 6-Channel Computer Radio System-Air. $199.99
FUTK6110 6K 6-Channel Computer Radio System-Heli. $199.99

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EHang Ghost Brushless RTF Drone For Android Or iOS Devices

EHang Ghost Brushless RTF Drone For Android Or iOS Devices

People who have always considered a drone too complex to fly need to know this: that they can make the Ghost do everything they want it to do in seconds, even if they’ve never flown a drone before. The Ghost literally puts control at their fingertips and lets them fly and navigate with the ease of today’s simplest control system.

They can make the Ghost take off, return and land with just a tap on their devices’ screens. What’s more, a tap is also all it takes to make the Ghost fly to a specific destination – or to activate “Auto-Follow” mode and have it track the pilot’s every move. It remains stable and level even in 20 mph winds and will automatically maintain position and altitude while hovering without constant adjustments.

Ghost control is absolutely rock-solid anywhere within its one thousand meter (0.62 mile) range. Fail-safes offer added safety and protection, automatically returning the Ghost to the pilot if the signal is lost or if the battery voltage drops to unsafe levels.

In addition to a factory-assembled drone, resilient body shell and advanced brushless power system, the complete Ghost package also includes a 3-axis, 360° camera gimbal compatible with GoPro® cameras.

Simple to fly with just a smartphone! Versions for Android and iOS devices!

The Gbox offers the latest in smart technology and easy flying, and versions for both Android and iOS devices. With a tap on the Auto-Follow icon, the Ghost will follow a pilot anywhere without any other commands. Ideal for effortless flying and selfies! Made of strong, aircraft-grade aluminum, the gimbal has vibration-dampening rubber mounts that keep the camera stable even when the drone is not. It’s compatible with many popular cameras, including the GoPro Hero 3 & 4. Camera sold separately.

Both versions include:

  • Assembled drone with colored LEDs
  • Wireless Gbox
  • 3-axis, 360° gimbal compatible with GoPro® Hero 3 & 4 cameras
  • High-capacity 5400mAh LiPo battery good for up to 23 minutes of flying.
  • Battery charger
  • (8) 3-blade propellers

Specifications:

Diagonal Measurement: 370 mm (14.6 in)
Weight w/o Battery: 650 g (22.9 oz)
Requires: app, device for Android or iOS & camera
Flight Time: 18-23 minutes
Maximum Range: 1,000 meters (0.62 miles)

EHGE03LL Ghost for Android devices. . $749.98
EHGE04LL Ghost for iOS devices. . $749.98

Available: Early September

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Spektrum DXe Transmitter And AR610 Receiver

Spektrum DXe Transmitter And AR610 Receiver

The Spektrum™ DXe combines the versatility of a programmable transmitter with the simplicity of a basic sport radio to give cost-conscious pilots a better choice when it comes to flying on a budget. Instead of having to reconfigure a bank of servo-reversing and wing-type switches every time you want to fly a different model, the DXe lets you instantly change those settings using a mobile device or PC.

Point and Click Programming

If you’ve ever managed a music library on your PC or smart phone, you can program the DXe. All you need is the free Spektrum programming app or software and a Spektrum programming cable (sold separately). Using this interface you can create and save basic model setups with different settings for:

  • Servo Reversing
  • Stick Configuration: Mode 1-4
  • Wing Type: Normal or Delta/Elevon
  • Expo: On or Off

Once saved to your PC or mobile device, you can upload the setup for a specific model to the DXe with a simple point and click. You can also use the interface to upload pre-programmed setups for Bind-N-Fly® aircraft.

The Spektrum programming app is available at Google Play and iTunes app stores. The PC software can be downloaded from spektrumrc.com.

More than Meets the Eye

While the DXe looks and functions like a basic 6-channel transmitter out of the box, it gives pilots the control functions they need to fly a wide variety of Bind-N-Fly aircraft using pre-programmed setups. Functions include:

  • Four Control Surface Channels
  • 3-Position Flap Switch
  • 2-Position Auxiliary Function Switch
  • 3-Position Flight Mode Switch for AS3X/SAFE-Equipped Aircraft
  • Bind/Panic/Return Home Button for SAFE-Equipped Aircraft

Point and Click Programming

If you’ve ever managed a music library on your PC or smart phone, you can program the DXe. All you need is the free Spektrum programming app or software and a Spektrum programming cable (sold separately). Using this interface you can create and save basic model setups with different settings for:

  • Servo Reversing
  • Stick Configuration: Modes 1-4
  • Wing Type: Normal or Delta/Elevon
  • Expo: On or Off

Once saved to your PC or mobile device, you can upload the setup for a specific model to the DXe with a simple point and click.

You can also use the interface to upload pre-programmed setups for Bind-N-Fly® aircraft.

The Spektrum programming app is available at Google Play and iTunes app stores. The PC software can be downloaded from spektrumrc.com.

More than Meets the Eye

While the DXe looks and functions like a basic 6-channel transmitter out of the box, it gives pilots the control functions they need to fly a wide variety of Bind-N-Fly aircraft using pre-programmed setups. Functions include:

  • Throttle, Aileron, Elevator and Rudder Channels
  • 3-Position Flap Switch
  • 2-Position Auxiliary Function Switch
  • 3-Position Flight Mode Switch for AS3X/SAFE-Equipped Aircraft
  • Bind/Panic/Return Home Button for SAFE-Equipped Aircraft

Features:

  • Sport radio simplicity + programmable versatility
  • Programmed via mobile device or PC
  • Ideal for Bind-N-Fly aircraft
  • Four control surface channels
  • 3-Position flap switch
  • 2-Position auxiliary function switch
  • 3-position AS3X/SAFE flight mode switch
  • Requires free programming app or software
  • Requires SPMA3081 or SPMA3065 programming cable, sold separately
  • EN328 compatible

Specifications:

# of Channels: Depending on configuration, 6 to 9
Modulation: DSMX
Band: 2.4GHz
Receiver: AR610
Programming Features: Airplane
Modes: User Selectable Mode 1-4
Transmitter (Tx) Battery Type: 4 AA Alkaline
Experience Level: Beginner

SPM1000 – DXe Transmitter System w/ AR610 Receiver – $89.99
SPMR1000 – DXe Transmitter Only – $59.99

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Engine Swap for the Camel

Engine Swap for the Camel

Well, it has been an active flying season so far and I have flown the Sopwith Camel several times including at the big Fun Fly on Father’s Day in Kingston, Ontario in June, at the recent Warbirds over Delaware in July, at our home field in Farmington, CT and at the Dawn Patrol event at the Long Island Sky Hawks field on Long Island in August! The last time I flew it however, the usually very reliable Zenoah G-38 gas engine started to make some weird clicking, rattling noises. I thought that it might have been just the hot weather and the engine running a little lean. I landed but could not find any obvious issues with the model. The next day I fired up the engine and right about mid throttle I heard the noise again! There was only a few weeks before the WW1 Jamboree at the Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome, (Sept. 11 – 13) so I made the decision to pull the engine and install a new G38. (You can’t have enough spare engines!)

A1

I cleaned off the model and unbolted the engine from the firewall. I found to my surprise that the lower soft mount rubber bolt isolators had actually melted (Softened) and were deformed. Actually, all four isolators were compromised. The G-38 is a rear exhaust engine and I have a large volume muffler just 3/4 inches from the lower isolators. I was amazed, not only were the isolators deformed, they were also much more soft than normal and the holes had enlarged allowing the attachment bolts to move. I could easily turn the lock nuts with little effort! So off with the old hardware and in with the new.

First, I pulled out the new replacement engine and gave it a quick run on my test rig to make sure it was in working order. Ever notice how nice a new engine out of the box smells!?

A3

I removed the soft mounts and also made some new engine spacers to push the entire engine about 1/2 inch forward to increase the tight propeller to cowling spacing. I then swapped out the aluminum mount plate, carburetor and the muffler from the older engine.

carb

The old engine was equipped with the carburetor from my old Quadra Q50 engine and it is equipped with a choke and a intake stack.

A4

So, to replace the isolators I went back to a hard-mount setup and used 5/8-inch hardwood dowels to fill the holes in the firewall and plywood soft mount plate block. Shown here also are the two 1/4 inch spacer blocks made from plywood. I drilled the 1/4 inch holes in the dowels with them chucked in my lathe so the holes would run true through the 1-inch length of the dowels.

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Using bar clamps and some 15 minute Z-Poxy I glued the dowels and the mount plate back into place on and through the firewall.

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Here’s the new firewall setup. I then bolted the new G38 into place with the plywood spacers between the engine and the mount plate. With the spacer plates added I also had to make a new throttle linkage pushrod which took about 10 minutes using a threaded 4-40 pushrod wire, a brass threaded coupler and two Du-Bro ball-link clevises.

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While I was at it, I also switched from the 18×8 propeller size I was running to the 20×0 Xoar prop shown here. This increases the prop disk by almost 60 square inches and helps load the engine better than before. Most of my WW1 flying buddies had recommended me switch to the next size bigger prop as the old engine was revving too high.

The bolt hole in the 20×8 propeller is larger than in the 18×8 propeller, so I used some aluminum heater duct tape to shim the attachment bolt to the correct size. My test run proved to have eliminated the alarming engine noise and I am now ready to do some dogfighting at the Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome!

Flyby1B

The basic numbers for the new engine installation are a nice improvement. The 18×8 propeller was indeed revving a bit too high at 7,300 rpm and the idle was about 1,900 to 2,000, very reliable. The new Xoar 20×8 propeller loads the G38 at full power to 6,900 rpm which is only a 400 rev lose from the smaller propeller. considering that the G-38 produces its max torque output at 5,040rpm, (from a Mike Billinton engine review in MAN/April 1994 issue), the new prop is a lot closer to the proper power band. And the idle is now at a solid 1,700 rpm. Also, I reworked the throttle linkage so it is very linear throughout the full throttle stick travel. Test flight was very rewarding with a better takeoff performance and a lower throttle setting for cruise. Landings seem to be about the same but there is still a need to keep in about 1/4 throttle for the final approach.

As for the old engine, I will test run it on the stand with a solid mount and see if the noise is still there. If not, then this engine will be ready for a new airframe!

Can’t wait to see you all at the Rhinebeck Jamboree!

 

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2/3-scale Hanriot HD.1

2/3-scale Hanriot HD.1

We first featured Ian Turney-White’s impressive WW I biplane a few years ago in Model Airplane News, and we were thrilled to see it fly in a recent video shot at a Large Model Association meet at in Elvington, England. Powered by a 425cc JPX engine, the 19-foot-span scratch-built model weighs in at 195 pounds. In addition to highlighting its great flight characteristics, this video by Dean and Pete Coxon shows a lot of the plane’s scale details. Enjoy!

Model Airplane News - The #1 resource for RC plane and helicopter enthusiasts featuring news, videos, product releases and tech tips.

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Jeti Pro Power 30C Li-Poly Batteries

Jeti Pro Power 30C Li-Poly Batteries

As Lithium Polymer battery technology continues to push new boundaries, Jeti Pro Power Lithium Polymer Batteries bring a whole new element into the mix – power & performance at a price that simply can’t be ignored.

Designed specifically for the demands of the latest power plants, not to mention the new realm of extreme 3D flight, Jeti Pro Power brings a whole new battery to bear at a cost never seen before. Simply put, premium power no longer comes at a premium price.

More Information: http://www.espritmodel.com/jeti-pro-power-30c-li-poly-batteries.aspx

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Learn the Slip to Landing

Learn the Slip to Landing

 

 

Executing the extreme side slip to landing requires a pilot to be comfortable with using rudder as well as cross-controlling rudder and aileron input. It is important to understand the balance of these two inputs, as all airplanes respond to control inputs in a different manner. If too much rudder and/or aileron are used to perform the extreme slip, the pilot may become overwhelmed when his aircraft performs a variation of the negative snap roll. After all, the commands are similar!

Let’s take a look at my personal rate and exponential setup on my Extreme Flight 48-inch Laser EXP and cover all of the steps necessary to perform this stunt with finesse. This airplane is the perfect example aircraft as it was designed to excel at both precise and extreme maneuvers. It exhibits docile slow-speed flight characteristics and has strong rudder authority, especially when equipped with the included side-force generators, which increase the side area of the model and increase the airplane’s rudder authority.

BEFORE WE BEGIN

When you are going to fly the extreme slip to landing, a lot of control throw on the elevator and aileron control surfaces are not needed. Rather, the low-rate settings supplied by the plane’s manufacturer should suffice. On the other hand, a fair amount of rudder deflection should be used as the amount of rudder deflection will determine the slip angle that you can achieve in flight.

On my Laser EXP, I have about 15 degrees of elevator and aileron deflection and about 30 degrees of rudder deflection. To make the airplane more precise, especially when giving small corrections, exponential is a must! Exponential softens how the airplane responds to a certain control input. For example, during the side slip, the pilot will command large amounts of rudder deflection. When making small corrections with rudder and feeding more rudder input in to increase the slip angle, it is beneficial if the aircraft isn’t sensitive in yaw inputs, making its flight appear erratic. With the rates mentioned earlier, I use about 25% exponential on the aileron and elevator surfaces and about 40% exponential on the rudder.

EXTREME SLIP TO LANDING OVERVIEW

Like all landings, this one is no different. You should perform a downwind leg, turn on to base, and turn on to final so the aircraft is traveling into the wind. At that point, line up with the runway. To initiate the slip, a slight amount of aileron will bank the aircraft about 15 degrees in roll, and opposite rudder input should will cause the aircraft to slip in the yaw axis.

As soon as the slip has begun, you will need to balance aileron and rudder to keep a constant slip in motion. In addition, use elevator and throttle to keep a constant descent and to bring the aircraft to a three-point landing. Before the aircraft touches the ground, though, release rudder and aileron inputs to stop the slip and to straighten out. Stopping the slip before the flare is key so both main wheels touch down at the same time. Done properly, the airplane will track straight down the runway and the side load on the landing gear will be reduced.

Now, let’s simplify matters and divide this exciting landing into four steps.

STEP 1. Begin by lining the aircraft up with the runway, traveling into the wind. In this example, the landing will be from right to left, and the aircraft will be rolled to the left so that the top of the model is visible during the approach. Apply a small amount of left aileron to bank the wings of the aircraft and follow that input with right rudder to establish a slip angle.

STEP 2. Once some rudder has been applied, you’ll need to increase the amount of up-elevator to keep a constant descent angle. Also, use throttle to keep up the speed of the aircraft. Using too much rudder will greatly decrease the speed of the aircraft, but the speed of the airplane also depends on the descent angle.

STEP 3. Keep the nose of the aircraft down slightly and remember to balance rudder and aileron input accordingly. Using too much aileron and rudder input at the same time can result in a negative snap roll variant! Keep the bank angle limited, but add rudder input as needed to keep a graceful slip.

STEP 4. As the airplane approaches the runway, decrease the slip angle by releasing rudder input and correct the bank angle of the wings with the ailerons. Add power as needed to keep the speed of the aircraft up and perform a flare. The best manner to approach this portion of the maneuver is to wait until the last moment before touchdown.

 


Rudder input is very important for establishing a slip.

These are the basic control inputs that are needed in performing this exhilarating maneuver. However, this type of landing is not only a crowd-pleaser; it’s also beneficial during an emergency situation like a motor failure. Occasionally, a motor will fail forcing the pilot to land downwind as the airplane may not be high enough to actually make a lap and turn into the wind. At that point, the pilot should line the aircraft up with the runway and perform a side slip to drop altitude and airspeed if the airplane is traveling faster than desired. As the aircraft approaches the runway, the pilot can level the aircraft out, release rudder and aileron and perform a flare for the perfect emergency approach.

FINAL THOUGHTS

You have now learned the fundamentals behind the extreme slip to landing. This move is a true head-turner, but can also prove advantageous in an emergency situation like the motor failure mentioned earlier. Remember, though, that practice pays off as this can be quite a challenging maneuver to execute properly. Control input amounts will differ from one airframe to another, and you should familiarize yourself with how your aircraft reacts to rudder and aileron inputs and observe how your aircraft responds at a safe altitude. The most important step is to properly balance rudder and aileron inputs to establish the most extreme side-slip landing. Above all else, always remember to have fun.

By John Glezellis

Illustrations by FX Models

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Video: dead-stick flight!

Video: dead-stick flight!

Murillo Ghigonetto knows his scratch-built Telemaster can fly like a dream in any conditions. After he installed a selfie stick in its left wing, he flew it to altitude and shut the engine off to not only show how well the Telemaster could fly deadstick but also to showcase the beautiful Brazilian countryside around his flying field. Great video and flying, Murillo — thanks for sharing!

Model Airplane News - The #1 resource for RC plane and helicopter enthusiasts featuring news, videos, product releases and tech tips.

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Video: dead-stick flight!

Video: dead-stick flight!

Murillo Ghigonetto knows his scratch-built Telemaster can fly like a dream in any conditions. After he installed a selfie stick in its left wing, he flew it to altitude and shut the engine off to not only show how well the Telemaster could fly deadstick but also to showcase the beautiful Brazilian countryside around his flying field. Great video and flying, Murillo — thanks for sharing!

Model Airplane News - The #1 resource for RC plane and helicopter enthusiasts featuring news, videos, product releases and tech tips.